ARC353. Vertical Studio / Summer 2015

The design studio this summer is a vertical studio. That means sophomore, junior and senior students will be represented, and all of the objectives from each course will be addressed in each project at level.

We will work in two different projects. The first one is a short project for everyone in order to make clear the current abilities and background on every student. The case is a house for a 68-year-old retired professor of SIU Department of Forestry, currently in charge of Evergreen Park maintenance. He is a widower living alone, but tended to receive frequent guests at home for dinner or fishing, not to stay overnight. The site is on the tip of Evergreen Park’s Southwest section and it is around 40,000 sq. ft. on the Carbondale city reservoir waterfront. The house must be a cube figure with 21 x 21 x 21 feet on external dimensions and observing aesthetics and grace in a proposal of identifiable cube shape (6 faces, 8 corners). While comprising around 600 sq. ft. of indoor useful area its program should include, but not be limited to, living, dining, kitchen, bedroom, bathroom, storage, plus outdoor conveniences. The rooftop can be used as walkable area, but it doesn’t count as useful area. See the results here.

On the second project we will work with a more elaborated case during the last 5 weeks of the summer session. As said, every student will participate on all of these projects but with different approaches, tasks and requirements according to each studio level. This will be the Illinois High School Basketball Hall of Fame, in Pinckneyville Illinois, which is known for its many successful basketball teams led by its legendary coaches: Duster Thomas and Dick Corn, and it will recognize the value of all achievements reached through years. The plans include establishing a museum, which will showcase the history of prep basketball in Illinois and will exhibit memorabilia and films of the sport, it will also include the Hall of Fame which will honor the finest of basketball state players and coaches, there will be a gift shop, storage rooms, some other facilities to make it work and a large lobby area which will be a perfect venue for sports banquets, meetings, recognitions, social events for rent, etc. See the results here.


ARC551. Comprehensive Architectural Design Studio: on-line version / spring 2015

 SIU Carbondale 05/09/2015  

SIU Carbondale 05/09/2015
 

This on-line architectural design studio focuses upon comprehensive design and serves as the culmination of the fulfillment of students’ performance criteria through the integration of all major building and urban systems while addressing human, social, and environmental issues. The site for this project is located in Barcelona, Spain, one of today’s most influential world cities in terms of the function of linking the history of the human being with his potential for the future.

The studio will require applying both a breadth and depth of knowledge to the design process. Breadth refers to the range of considerations embraced in design process and exploration of history, theory, site analysis, program analysis, regulatory requirements, building technology, and environmental issues/energy analysis as they apply to your project. Depth refers to the maturity, clarity, and sophistication of ideas, thorough development of the project and efficient, clear, and successful representation and communication of your ideas.

The products in this Studio are mainly two: a Master Plan proposal developed by groups and a Building Architectural Design to be developed individually. However, there are some additional preliminary assignments which give support and create an important data base for the first.

To see the preliminary assignments and Projects included in the present course click here.


ARC452. Integration Studio: INTERNATIONAL CO-TAUGHT EDITION / Spring 2015

 New Harmony 01/24/2015  

New Harmony 01/24/2015
 

This comprehensive design studio focuses the knowledge and skills developed in all previous courses on a single project. This is a project development course that emphasizes the integration of the basic elements of building, structural, environmental and other technologies for a two or more story building. The first half of the semester includes a series of assignments to go over important knowledge supporting architectural design such as site analysis, structural and lighting design, environmental systems, building materials, assemblies, and envelope systems. The second half of the semester includes continued design development and documentation of the same project, although this design process starts in the first half with concept and schematic project development. There are two possible sites for the location of this project. This semester is also will be integrating students from Mexico to work with the SIU students on this project.

The Project: The bases of the case will follow the guidelines of the 2014-2015 ACSA Steel Competition, this year the case project is a Library. Among other important considerations Steel should be used as the primary structural material and the whole built facilities must size at least 30,000 square feet. They must include: creative and innovative use of structural steel in the design solution, at least one long-span steel structure section, successful response of the design to its surrounding context, and successful response to basic architectural concepts such as human activity needs, structural integrity, and coherence of architectural vocabulary. The library design should be guided by the principles of innovation, creativity, iconic identity, sustainability, functionality, efficiency, and either harmony or purposeful disharmony with the neighboring context depending on the story that it is intended to be told through the project. although the main product of the studio is a building Architectural Design , there are also included some additional preliminary assignments which give support and create an important data base for the first.

To see the preliminary assignments and Projects included in the present studio click here.


ARC551. Comprehensive Architectural Design Studio / FALL 2014

 Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro  

Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro
 

This architectural design studio is focused upon comprehensive design of a Master Plan developed by groups and a large-scale building Architectural Design to be developed individually as an integration of architectural systems and design criteria. This course serves as the culmination of the fulfillment of student performance through the integration of all major building and urban systems while addressing the current human, social, and environmental issues. This studio's site is Rio De Janeiro Brazil, where the Olympic Games are being held in 2016. The site is based on AECOM Olympic Legacy project from 2030, legacy as a permanent use of a great amount of the facilities created for such an important international event. For our studio we are taking a small part of the overall Olympic legacy project and redesign it with the mandatory program of land use.

1. The first assignment is to work in teams to create a Master Plan of the site. There is a mandatory program for the site, with an opportunity to add more program if the team agrees upon it. During the second part of the assignment the master plan can also be updated as needed.  See results here.

2. The second assignment is done individually, and is to design a building that is either a residential project or a hotel. The individual has a certain amount of square meters to follow, and it is imperative that the building flows together with the Master Plan solution designed by the correspondent team.  See the results here.


ARC351. DESIGN III: CONTEXT / FALL 2014

  Old Shawneetown 10/08/2014

Old Shawneetown 10/08/2014

Design III studio is devoted to the context. We have a context in a town structure according to social, political and economic components. At the same time, there is a context according to the Government and the community that contains us. We also have the urban context expressed in terms of the city profile or skyline with all its image characteristics and, what most frequently discussed, we have a natural context of the landscape elements (ecology) surrounding our plot. All this is the context that surrounds us and which we must take into account in design process. However, taking it into account does not mean to imitate it or continue it, not necessarily. Therefore, context is that important factor to always consider. This studio contains 4 cases seeking to exercise the idea of context from different points of view. The main objective behind this is to strengthen the intention of considering the context as a basic component in all architectural design exercise. 

1. The first assignment is to design an Interfaith Lakefront Chapel. An interfaith place is a unanimously respected place, mainly because it is a shared site not only with similar but also strangers who once feel very distant but, at the same time, perceives very closely when it comes to coexist under the same roof. It is a place of meetings of recognition, of confidence, of opening, but it is also a place of profound silence caused by the common denominator of all visitors in search of introspection and meditation.  See the results here.

2. The second assignment is the design of an addition site to the McCormick Place at Chicago. McCormick Place, as the main conferences and conventions center of the United States, gathers annually more than 3 million visitors. It is made up of four interconnected buildings sited on and near the shore of Lake Michigan, about 2.5 miles south of downtown Chicago. The purpose is to create a dining and gathering open space on a 340,800 sq. ft. plot over an underground parking area to serve convention visitors as well as other crowds from around, especially from the Soldier Field, the home of Chicago Bears, NFL professional football team, and from the U.S. Cellular Field, home of the White Sox, Major League professional team.  See the results here.

3. The third assignment is the design of the Southern Illinois Historical Gallery at a very interesting place. Old Shawneetown is a small town in Gallatin County. This town is one of the oldest settlements of Illinois and, together with Washington D.C., the only towns in history chartered by the United States government, since it served as an important federal government administrative center for the Northwest Territory after the Revolution. The town has been damaged feverously by floods caused by the river overflowing and stopped its growth after the 1937 flood instead of reconstructing it once more, provoking the arising of a new settlement few miles away. The intention is to propose a great building with the double intention of standing out old objects exposed over a contrasting high-tech scenario, and also to spark off other attractions that could be built within the town. See the results here.

4. The fourth assignment is a homage to a great modern architect. Even though Richard Neutra was not born in the United States but in Austria, his main work was done in America, especially in California. This design shall be a new version of Neutra’s way of solving houses but with 70 years more advanced technologies. Students are interpreting Neutra as he would be proud of using our nowadays high tech procedures and materials to build a one story coastal house. For doing so we are taking a piece of land in Palos Verdes, on the California shore, as a contribution to this land and homage to this great architecture master. See the results here.


ARC353. Vertical Studio / Summer 2014

 Downtown Carbondale 2014  

Downtown Carbondale 2014
 

The design studio this summer is a vertical studio.  That means students from a number of year levels will be represented, from the second, third, and fourth year.  Some students are taking the first semester of those years, other students the second semester. Many forces at work in the environment affect the form and order of a building, or community, or a region within a city or community.  A complex set of forces will determine the character of a building, what it looks like, how it feels.  It could be argued that the building is not anything more or less than the sum of the forces that act on it, interpreted through the heart and mind of the architect. 

1. The first assignment is to design a graphic composition out of one of the songs from the list provided.  There are no rules for the components to be included, there could be as figurative or abstract as you wish. See the results here.

2. The second assignment is to represent the song Vincent (Don McLean, 1971) in the spatial proposal of a pavilion. You are expected to create an inhabitable pavilion so be sure to keep in mind that humans should be able to go all over the place. See the results here.

3. The third assignment is a three-in-one project, since there is the commitment of designing a lengthened plaza, aparking lot underneath this, and a hotel on one of its sides, for downtown Carbondale. It is important to consider the surrounding current streets’ levels and keep the Plaza to an even level even though the current topography may be uneven. It will be necessary to make a tree inventory of the place, since every outstanding species should remain on site and be part of the final solution. See the results here.

4. The fourth assignment is composed by three different cases. Sophomore students will be proposing a new Fire Station for the city of Minneapolis in its southeast area.  The primary requirement is that the firefighters can reach any point in this service area within five minutes.  Junior students will be solving a request from the trustee of a major university, which of has do­nated a site and funds to that institution for the development of a Historic Preservation Research Library complex. The site is now part of the university campus, and is improved by one building of historic significance and, until recently, several nondescript structures. Senior students will be designing a fine Art Museum for the city of Carlton with the double intention to preserve and exhibit objects called works of art and to enable as many people as possible to experience those objects as effectively and as pleasantly as possible:  the “confrontation of object and observer. Even though, hopefully, the building will be a creative contribution to the history of the art of architecture, the building itself should play a supporting role to the reasons for its existence, not a dominating role.  See the results here.


ARC452. Integration design Studio / Spring 2014

This comprehensive design studio focuses the knowledge and skills developed in all previous courses on a single project. The course emphasizes the design integration of the building’s structural and environmental systems.

1. The first assignment consisted of a House for a married couple of graduate students at SIU Carbondale. It must be of 22 x 22 x 22 feet on external dimensions, and its esthetics and grace must show an identifiable cube shape. It must be designed with steel structure and its useful area must be between 500 and 700 sq. ft. The rooftop can be used as walking area, but it doesn't count as useful area. It is important to consider efficiency on Structure (geometry and elements), Insulation (materials), and Energy optimization (orientation). It is also required to deliver a structure inventory (in pounds and sq. ft.) of the total of the proposed structural elements. See the results here.

2. The second assignment followed the guidelines of the 2013-2014 ACSA/AISC Student Design Competition in the category "Border-Crossing Station". Steel should be used as the primary structural material with special emphasis placed on innovation in steel design, and the whole built facilities must size as much as 100,000 square feet.  Among other important considerations, the proposals must include: creative and innovative use of structural steel in the design solution, at least one long-span steel structure section, successful response of the design to its surrounding context, and successful response to basic architectural concepts such as human activity needs, structural integrity, and coherence of architectural vocabulary. Your Border-Crossing Station design should be guided by the principles of innovation, creativity, iconic identity, sustainability, functionality, efficiency, and either harmony or purposeful disharmony with the neighboring context border depending on the story that you wish to tell through your project. Design solutions should be driven by culturally significant imagery based on the border and the site’s visual and literal unifying elements. The main design challenges are to determine a suitable scale of the station, and to resolve the specific program requirements to work with complex site circulation needs and other contextual restrictions. Buildings may become a network of spaces for determined vehicle crossing checkpoints and/or a series of ancillary support spaces to accommodate the increase in border-crossing activities that might be seasonal. See the results here.